Kentucky gonzo crime writer Greg Barth let me onto his podcast to talk about my books. So it seemed only right to return the favor and check out some of

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This is the first thriller I’ve read by David Baldacci and it’s clear he deserves his bestseller status. He’s a pro. The story is fluid, he’s got a pretty good

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Bright Air Black

Bright Air Black is the best book I’ve read in a long time. David Vann has retold the story of Medea, one of the most controversial, powerful and compelling characters

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A Hell of a Woman

A Hell of a Woman blends two things I like about Jim Thompson’s pulp novels of the 1950s: a deep dive into the criminal mind, and thoughtful ambiguity. Most of

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Slayground

Greg Barth recently hosted a podcast discussing the works of Richard Stark, the pseudonym of author Donald Westlake when he wrote the hardboiled Parker series. Inspired by the discussion, I

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The Silver Way

China is not content to merely slot into a role determined by the West. But what does that mean – war? This post is being written in January 2017, in

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Shinjuku Shark

Detective Samejima is a loner, a tough-guy cop with a hot girlfriend singing in a rock band. His superiors detest him, his colleagues don’t trust him, and the yakuza…fear him.

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White Butterfly

Walter Mosley is among the great American crime fiction writers. His Easy Rawlins series, which began with Devil in a Blue Dress, is as good as anything else to come

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The Black Count

The Black Count is an exceptionally good book – and a biography about a man whose story resonates today. Tom Reiss spent a decade digging through original, hard-to-find source material to tell the story of General Alex Dumas, the father of the novelist Alexandre Dumas (who, confusingly, is often referred to as Alexandre Dumas, pere, in order to distinguish him from his son, the general’s grandson, also Alexandre, fils, a playwright).

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King Norodom’s Head

King Norodom’s Head: Phnom Penh Sights Beyond the Guidebooks is a proudly minor book. Yet in its embrace of obscure tales from a small, misunderstood country, King Norodom’s Head sheds light on the big, the epic and the sweeping.

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