I finished reading What We Reckon by Eryk Pruitt the day Charles Manson died. Manson put the cult in American culture, although it would take Jim Jones to get us

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The Tears of Autumn was published in 1974 but it is relevant to 2017, in a harrowing way. Charles McCarry is the finest espionage novelist to come out of the

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This is a contender for the best book I’ve read this year. Five stars, the works. But before I talk about The Marsh King’s Daughter, I’m going to tell a

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Karin Slaughter – what a name for a thriller writer! – is a massive bestseller for a good reason, as I found out when I read her Cop Town. Her story

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I got the chance to meet Barry Lancet, and he’s almost as cool as his protagonist, Jim Brodie. Like Brodie, Lancet has spent his adult life in Japan. Like Brodie,

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K.J. Howe has written a slick action-adventure featuring a kickass heroine, well-crafted set pieces, and authority about the shadowy world of kidnapping. Let’s take them in order. Thea Paris is

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[This article originally appeared as a guest post for The Rap Sheet.] I was lucky to find what was probably the last hardcover copy of Siam to be sold in

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There are few Korean novels that have been translated into English, but I bet more will come. Kim Young-ha is leading the way; he is a literary rock star in

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Malice, a mid-1990s whodunit by Keigo Higashino, is a carefully constructed set of twists. The story is a series of switchbacks between an author who may or may not have

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Ross Macdonald’s first Lew Archer mystery, The Moving Target, was published in 1949. Macdonald drew deliberately on Dashiel Hammett and Raymond Chandler, and is recognized as a founding father of

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