K.J. Howe has written a slick action-adventure featuring a kickass heroine, well-crafted set pieces, and authority about the shadowy world of kidnapping. Let’s take them in order. Thea Paris is

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[This article originally appeared as a guest post for The Rap Sheet.] I was lucky to find what was probably the last hardcover copy of Siam to be sold in

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There are few Korean novels that have been translated into English, but I bet more will come. Kim Young-ha is leading the way; he is a literary rock star in

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Malice, a mid-1990s whodunit by Keigo Higashino, is a carefully constructed set of twists. The story is a series of switchbacks between an author who may or may not have

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Ross Macdonald’s first Lew Archer mystery, The Moving Target, was published in 1949. Macdonald drew deliberately on Dashiel Hammett and Raymond Chandler, and is recognized as a founding father of

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A Rage in Harlem is the first of Chester Himes’s 1950s-era crime series featuring Coffin Ed Johnson and Grave Digger Jones, two black cops in the capital of black America.

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Jean-Patrick Manchette was a French crime-fiction writer whose main body of work was published in the 1970s. He caught the bug in part because his second wife had translated American

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Kentucky gonzo crime writer Greg Barth let me onto his podcast to talk about my books. So it seemed only right to return the favor and check out some of

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This is the first thriller I’ve read by David Baldacci and it’s clear he deserves his bestseller status. He’s a pro. The story is fluid, he’s got a pretty good

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A Hell of a Woman blends two things I like about Jim Thompson’s pulp novels of the 1950s: a deep dive into the criminal mind, and thoughtful ambiguity. Most of

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